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Being A 737NG Pilot Is Quite Beautiful (Video)

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Stunning views of flying over Europe in a 737. The airport shown is Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport. After seeing such images, who wouldn't want to be a pilot? (www.youtube.com) 기타...

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KennyFlys
Ken Lane 3
He does put out some good stuff.
SWEATINTHSWAMP
Enjoy every vid he puts out for publication, including the music :). He put me in touch with Audiomachine :):)
projectabove35000feet
This is a great video.
rockie5112
Please lose the meaningless music from these otherwise wonderful video's.

[This poster has been suspended.]

btweston
btweston 1
Actually it's a private company that outsources globally.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
A question only a layman would ask: when driving on wet pavement, we must be careful we maintain traction. Does the same apply when the tarmac's soaked? Is there a chance when taking off or landing of losing traction or is the plane heavy enough as to not be an issue?
KennyFlys
Ken Lane 1
Hydroplaning is a matter of how much water depth is on the surface and the ability for the tire to grip the pavement through the layer of water. A heavier weight will certainly push the tire through but possibly not enough so a tire could be even partially hydroplaning. That is, the center part of the tire can have pavement contact while the outer edges do not.

Other aspects are proper inflation of the tire so it is evenly and appropriately applied to the pavement under normal weight loads.

Even a million pound airplane can still hydroplane under the right circumstances. That becomes more critical on landing since you're trying to stop so you have anti-skid to keep the tires rolling regardless of their ability to grip the pavement. A stopped tire provides less or no control compared to a spinning tire in the direction of travel.

I hope that makes sense.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Total sense, and thanks for taking the time to explain. Now I have one more thing to be nervous about - living in Seattle we take off and land in rain A LOT.
xairbusdriver
No need to be nervous. That what the pilot(s) are paid to do. ;-) Seriously, I doubt that any commercial aircraft is built without a very effective anti-skid braking system. Very similar to what you may have on your car (but costing 10 times as much, of course!). The systems monitors all the wheels and if one is at a lower speed, it starts releasing the hydraulic pressure to that wheel's brakes. And it does this much better than any pilot can. All the pilot has to do is "stand" on the brakes for the shortest stopping distance, rain or shine. Small aircraft usually don't need that kind of stopping power, assuming they don't waste too much runway! LOL! You know, it's one of the three things you DON'T WANT: Runway behind you, "altitude" above you and too much decreasing airspeed! 8-|

What I never liked to hear when I asked for a braking action report was, "Well, we'll have one right after you land." LOL!
KennyFlys
Ken Lane 1
Something I forgot to mention.... many runways are designed to do two things...

Some runways are grooved so there is always a high point over a layer of water. They provide better contact in heavy rainfall by channeling the water off. But that could possibly still affect braking under dry conditions. Some operators don't like them because they wear tires faster.

More commonly, it's simply a rough surface with a mildly banked surface for water runoff to the sides.

On some highways, a road may be a very rough surface or very gritty. It will make the tire sound much louder. But that's a blessing in heavy rainfall allowing better road contact.
xairbusdriver
The rough formula for the speed is 9 times the square root of the tire pressure. The actual formula(s) can be found in this link. <http://www.nlr-atsi.nl/downloads/hydroplaning-of-modern-aircraft-tires.pdf> But I wouldn't want to be doing the math during flight! ;+)

The speed is more critical than the weight of the aircraft. The surface is only important if it reduces the depth of the water. And this applies to your car/truck just as much as your aircraft. However, it does assume an inflatable tire. Perhaps we should only use solid rubber or metal wheels? LOL!

A link to a Wikipedia page: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquaplaning>
KennyFlys
Ken Lane 1
You just had to go and ruin my explanation by adding something I don't have headache meds for!
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Don't give it a thought. I stopped reading it after the first sentence. I didn't really want to have to go get a Ph.D. to figure out if the answer was yes or no.

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